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Archive for the Category Nanotechnology

 
 

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Nano-Piezotronics New Class of Electronic Components

‘Nano-Piezotronics’ — New Class of Electronic Components from PhysOrg.com
Researchers have taken advantage of the unique coupled semiconducting and piezoelectric properties of zinc oxide nanowires to create a new class of electronic components and devices that could provide the foundation for a broad range of new applications. []

Indian, US scientists discuss nano computing at Agra

Indian, US scientists discuss nano computing at Agra

“Scores of eminent scientists from India and the US discussed several key issues in the field of nano computing at the Indo-US Shared Vision Workshop on soft, quantum and nano computing being held here.

The workshop, held at the Dayalbagh Educational Institute, began Friday with a talk by Nikhil Ranjan Pal, professor at the Indian Statistical Institute, Kolkata. He spoke on ‘Fuzzy Rule Based Systems: Applications, Design Issues, Solutions and Open Problems: Where do we stand?’.

Pal, an authority in the area of Fuzzy Systems, is a Fellow at the prestigious Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), US, and the Indian National Academy of Engineering. He is currently a visiting fellow in Taiwan as well.

He stressed how effective the tool of Fuzzy Logic was in a variety of applications ranging from satellite image processing to medical image processing for the detection of cancer in the young. While covering a wide range of issues in the field, he also explained them with great lucidity.

G. Ramnath, professor at the Rennsselaer Polytechnic Institute, US, talked on ‘Transmuting Nanostructures for Nanocomputing Technologies’.

The world of computing is set to be revolutionized with nano devices (nano = 10-9 m) wherein a few atoms would be manipulated to do computational functions to produce powerful computers that would make the computers of today appear pedestrian in comparison.

Ramnath detailed the work being done by developing carbon nanotube architectures to produce nanodevice architectures of the future.

‘Towards understanding the origin of genetic languages’ was the topic of Apoorva Patel, professor at the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore.

Lov K. Grover of Bell Labs, US, who chaired the session, said that Patel had made the presentation at his institute earlier and had been rated as one of the five most important talks ever given at Bell Labs.

In his talk, Patel explained how nature processes information in creating species with the lowest amount of information processing in the most optimal manner.

He provided pointers for answering the most complicated questions like ‘How did I come into being?’, ‘How does nature evolve life?’ and ‘What is Life?’.

Bringing together difficult concepts from Biology and Computer Science, Patel gave very convincing answers to some of these difficult questions on life”

I read this story off the wire you can read the entire story by clicking on the headline link was wondering if anyone out there has the speech in any format would love to hear more.

An Ultrafast Silicon Filter

An Ultrafast Silicon Filter

From Technology Review

Written By Prachi Patel-Predd

“A 15-nanometer-thick porous silicon membrane could lead to microfluidics filters and make protein purification and blood dialysis more efficient.

A porous silicon membrane that is a few nanometers thick can quickly filter liquids and separate molecules that are very close in size, researchers at the University of Rochester report in this week’s Nature. The new membrane could lead to efficient protein purification for use in research and drug discovery. It could also act roughly 10 times faster than current membranes used for blood dialysis, the artificial purification of blood. In addition, the membrane could be employed as a filter to separate molecules in microfluidics devices used to study DNA and proteins and as a substrate for growing neurological stem cells.”

Read the entire story by clicking on the headline but I just wanted to point out this could lead to other things like being able to bring down the levels of a patients HIV or Hepatitis virus in the blood by being able to filter the blood thru a purifier.

Breakin the law, Breakin the law

Moore’s Law seen extended in chip breakthrough

By Scott Hillis

“Intel Corp. and IBM have announced one of the biggest advances in transistors in four decades, overcoming a frustrating obstacle by ensuring microchips can get even smaller and more powerful.

The breakthrough, achieved via separate research efforts and announced on Friday, involves using an exotic new material to make transistors the tiny switches that are the building blocks of microchips.

The technology involves a layer of material that regulates the flow of electricity through transistors.

“At the transistor level, we haven’t changed the basic materials since the 1960s. So it’s a real big breakthrough,” said Dan Hutcheson, head of VLSI Research, an industry consultancy.

“Moore’s Law was coming to a grinding halt,” he added, referring to the industry maxim laid down by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore that the number of transistors on a chip doubles roughly every two years.

The result of Moore’s Law has been smaller and faster chips and their spread into a wide array of consumer products that now account for the bulk of the industry’s $250 billion in annual sales.

The latest breakthrough means Intel, IBM and others can proceed with technology roadmaps that call for the next generation of chips to be made with circuitry as small as 45 nanometers, about 1/2000th the width of a human hair.”

From me

This is such great news for the tech industry everything from Mobile devices to Games will be better faster and more colorful than ever before. When I read the entire article on the Reutuers web site I felt chills go down my spine and my hair raise up on my arms which is so creepy but cool so I knew right then I had to blog about it. Be sure to click on the link and read the article all the way thru. I think whatever company makes hafnium a silvery metal soon to be used in the next generation of chips will see there Stock sky rocket on the market.